Universalis
Wednesday 25 August 2021    (other days)
Wednesday of week 21 in Ordinary Time 
 or Saint Louis 
 or Saint Joseph of Calasanz, Priest 

Let us adore the Lord, for it is he who made us.

Year: B(I). Psalm week: 1. Liturgical Colour: Green.

Saint Louis (1214 - 1270)

He became King of France (as Louis IX) at the age of 12. He was married and had eleven children, to whom he gave an excellent upbringing. He was noted for his spirit of prayer and penitence and for his love for the poor. He ran his kingdom not only to give peace to the people and economic stability but also for their spiritual good. He founded the Sorbonne and was a friend of St Thomas Aquinas. He was a member of the Order of Penitents of St Francis of Assisi, which later became the Franciscan Third Order and is now known as the Secular Franciscan Order (OFS).
  Louis was trusted by his fellow-rulers in Europe and often asked to arbitrate in their disputes. He undertook two unsuccessful crusades to liberate Christ’s burial-place and on the second of these he died, near Carthage, in the year 1270.
  See also the articles in the Catholic Encyclopaedia and Wikipedia.

Saint Joseph of Calasanz (1557 - 1648)

He was born in Aragón, received an excellent education and was ordained priest. After working in his own country for some time he went to Rome, where he worked for the education of the poor and founded a religious congregation for that purpose. His idea was that every child should receive an education. As one might expect, he was the object of much envy and calumny. He died in Rome in 1648.

Other saints: St Mary of Jesus Crucified Baouardy (1846-1878)

25 Aug (where celebrated)
St Mary of Jesus Crucified was born into a Greek-Catholic family of the Melkite Rite, at Ibellin, Galilee in 1846. Mary was orphaned at the age of two and raised by her uncle in Alexandria, Egypt. During that time, she was made to work as a house servant after refusing a marriage arranged by her uncle. After suffering violent abuse at the hands of another house servant, Mary escaped her uncle’s house and found work as a domestic servant elsewhere, working in Alexandria, Jerusalem and Beirut.
  In 1862, she had moved to France with a family she was serving. In France, Mary discerned a vocation to the consecrated life. In 1867 she entered the Discalced Carmelites at Pau, France and was soon after sent with the founding group to the Carmel of Mangalore in India. She returned to France in 1872 and planned with her superiors to found a monastery in Bethlehem. In 1875 she went to the Holy Land where she built a monastery in Bethlehem and began planning for another at Nazareth. During the work of establishing the monasteries she fell and fractured her arm, which became gangrenous. Her health quickly declined and on the 26th August 1878, Mary died. She is noted for her supernatural gifts, especially for humility, for her devotion to the Holy Spirit, and her great love for the Church.
MT

About the author of the Second Reading in today's Office of Readings:

Second Reading: Saint Columbanus, Abbot (540? - 615)

Columbanus was born in Ireland before the middle of the sixth century. He was a monk from his youth and was learned in both sacred and secular literature. At the age of 45 he left Ireland and went to Europe, where he founded three monasteries in what is now France. His monastic rule was strict, based on Irish practice.
  King Thierry II of Burgundy had a veneration for Columbanus and often visited him. Columbanus’s criticisms of Thierry’s debauched living and practice of concubinage enraged the king’s grandmother Brunhild, and eventually Columbanus and all other Irish-born monks were ordered to be deported to Ireland. They eluded their captors, and after an unsuccessful attempt to evangelize the pagan tribes near modern-day Zürich they reached Italy, where Columbanus founded the monastery at Bobbio. He died there in 615.
  Columbanus’s writings are among the earliest evidence of Irish knowledge of Latin. His style combines an underlying passion with a strong and rhythmic rhetorical structure.

Liturgical colour: green

The theological virtue of hope is symbolized by the colour green, just as the burning fire of love is symbolized by red. Green is the colour of growing things, and hope, like them, is always new and always fresh. Liturgically, green is the colour of Ordinary Time, the orderly sequence of weeks through the year, a season in which we are being neither single-mindedly penitent (in purple) nor overwhelmingly joyful (in white).

Mid-morning reading (Terce)1 Peter 1:13-14 ©
Free your minds, then, of encumbrances; control them, and put your trust in nothing but the grace that will be given you when Jesus Christ is revealed. Do not behave in the way that you liked to before you learnt the truth, but make a habit of obedience.

Noon reading (Sext)1 Peter 1:15-16 ©
Be holy in all you do, since it is the Holy One who has called you, and scripture says: Be holy, for I am holy.

Afternoon reading (None)James 4:7-8,10 ©
Give in to God: resist the devil, and he will run away from you. The nearer you go to God, the nearer he will come to you. Humble yourselves before the Lord and he will lift you up.
Scripture readings taken from The Jerusalem Bible, published and copyright © 1966, 1967 and 1968 by Darton, Longman & Todd, Ltd and Doubleday, a division of Random House, Inc, and used by permission of the publishers. For on-line information about other Random House, Inc. books and authors, see the Internet web site at http://www.randomhouse.com.
 
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