Saints of the Day Saints and biographies from the Catholic calendar. This site is copyright © 2018 Universalis Publishing Limited. Universalis Publishing Ltd http://universalis.com/atomabout.xml http://universalis.com/static/bin/icon80.png 2018-11-15T19:00:00Z http://universalis.com/atomabout.xml#20181113.0 2018-11-12T19:00:00Z 2018-11-12T19:00:00Z Saint Frances Xavier Cabrini (1850 - 1917)
Celebrated: 13 Nov (United States)
She was born in Lombardy, the youngest of thirteen children. Because of her frail health she was refused admission to two convents. She devoted herself to teaching, and founded the Missionary Sisters of the Sacred Heart of Jesus, whose aim is to spread devotion to the Heart of Jesus by spiritual and corporal works of mercy, running homes for the old and the sick, orphanages, and schools. In 1889 the Pope sent her to New York, where she founded an orphanage. In all she founded 67 institutions across the United States, South America and Europe. She died of malaria at Chicago in 1917.
See also the web site of the Missionary Sisters of the Sacred Heart of Jesus.
http://universalis.com/atomabout.xml#20181113.1 2018-11-12T19:00:00Z 2018-11-12T19:00:00Z Saint Machar (8th century)
Celebrated: 13 Nov (Aberdeen)
Machar was a bishop of Irish origin. He came to Iona with Columba and preached in Mull, and later ministered to the Picts around Aberdeen.
http://universalis.com/atomabout.xml#20181113.2 2018-11-12T19:00:00Z 2018-11-12T19:00:00Z Bl Maria Teresa Scrilli (1825-1889)
Celebrated: 13 Nov
Maria Teresa Scrilli founded the Congregation at Montevarchi in Italy, on October 15, 1854, with the approval of Bishop Francesco Bronzuoli, the superiors of the Order, and with the agreement of the Grand Duke Leopold II. In 1860, with the fall of the Duchy of Tuscany and the unity of Italy, the Congregation was suppressed. Maria, certain she was doing the will of God, moved to Florence and, in 1875, refounded the community. Since then, the Institute, now known as the Sisters of Our Lady of Mount Carmel, has expanded into the United States, Canada, Poland, India, Brazil and the Czech Republic. The Congregation was affiliated to the Carmelite Order on March 31, 1929.
Mother Maria Teresa was profoundly connected to Carmelite spirituality which she knew, since childhood, from her reading of St Mary Magdalene de’ Pazzi. The spirit of contemplation, total abandonment to the will of God, and deep union with the Lord were the characteristics of her spiritual life.

MT

http://universalis.com/atomabout.xml#20181114.0 2018-11-13T19:00:00Z 2018-11-13T19:00:00Z St Dyfrig or Dubric or Dubricius
Celebrated: 14 Nov (Wales)
He was born in what is now Herefordshire, the illegitimate son of the daughter of a local king. He founded monasteries in south-east Wales, was the teacher of Saints Teilo and Samson among others, and exercised the functions of a bishop. He attended a synod in 545 and is thought to have died a few years later. As with so many Welsh saints of this period, firm dates are hard to come by: some sources put his death in the year 612. See also the article in Wikipedia.
http://universalis.com/atomabout.xml#20181114.1 2018-11-13T19:00:00Z 2018-11-13T19:00:00Z Saint Laurenc O'Toole (1128 - 1180)
Celebrated: 14 Nov (Ireland)
Also known as Lorcán Ua Tuathail, he was born at Castledermot, Kildare, Ireland. He was elected archbishop of Dublin in 1161 – he was the first elected archbishop, since his predecessor, Gregory, had already been bishop of Dublin when the city was raised to an archbishopric. He was the first Irish bishop of Dublin, and also the last one before the Reformation: Ireland was invaded by the Normans in 1170 and his successors were all Normans or Englishmen. He took part in the negotiations consequent on the invasion, and negotiated with Henry II of England. Forbidden for a while to return to Ireland after being made a papal legate by the Pope in Rome, he eventually persuaded Henry II to let him return, but he died on the journey, at Eu in Normandy.
http://universalis.com/atomabout.xml#20181114.2 2018-11-13T19:00:00Z 2018-11-13T19:00:00Z The Beatified Martyrs of Clifton Diocese
Celebrated: 14 Nov (Clifton)
Thomas Alfield, seminary priest, Douai. Born Gloucester 1552. Ministered in Gloucestershire. Executed, Tyburn 6 July 1585.
Richard Bere, Carthusian Monk, was a nephew of Abbot Bere of Glastonbury, where he was born and attended the Abbey School. He was a priest of the London Charterhouse and was starved to death with eight other monks for upholding the Supremacy of the Pope. He died in Newgate prison on 9 August 1537.
John Bodey, schoolmaster. Born Wells. Studied law, Douai. Executed, Andover 2 November 1583.
James Fenn, seminary priest, Rheims. Probably ministered in Somerset. Arrested at Brympton. Executed, Tyburn 12 February 1584.
John Gavan, Jesuit. Born London 1640, but family from Norrington, Wiltsshire. Ministered in Staffordshire. Executed in connection with Popish Plot, 20 June 1679.
John Hambley, seminary priest, Douai. Born St Mabyn near Bodmin, Cornwall, circa 1560. Arrested at Chard, released and again arrested. Executed Salisbury March 1587.
William Hart, seminary priest, Rheims, and then English College, Rome. Born Wells. Ministered in Yorkshire. After lengthy imprisonment executed, York 15 March 1583.
William Lampley, layman. Probably born at Gloucester, was tried for ‘persuading his kin to popery’. Executed at Gloucester sometime in 1588.
John Pibush was born at Thirsk and ordained at Rheims and then ministered in England. He was arrested at Moreton-in-Marsh, taken to London then brought to Gloucester. He escaped from the local jail, but was recaptured and sent back to London. After five years in jail was executed in 1601.
Margaret Pole, Countess of Salisbury. Born Farleigh Castle, Somerset. Daughter of Duke of Clarence. Governess to the Princess Mary, later Mary Tudor. Mother of Cardinal Reginald Pole, last Catholic Archbishop of Canterbury. Executed, Tower of London 28 May 1541.
Edward Powell, seminary priest of Welsh birth. Taught at Eton and Oxford. Rector of Bleadon, Somerset. Vicar of St Mary Redcliffe. Executed, Smithfield 30 July 1540.
Philip Powell, monk of St Gregory’s, Douai. Born in Breconshire. Ministered for 20 years at Leigh Barton on Exmoor. Executed, Tyburn 30 June 1646.
Alexander Rawlins, seminary priest, Rheims. Rather tenuous connections with diocese. Probably born Oxford 1560. Ministered mainly in the North East. Executed, York 7 April 1595.
Stephen Rowsham, seminary priest. Born in Oxfordshire circa 1555. Took orders in the established church but converted and went to Douai Abbey. Was imprisoned in The Tower, banished but returned. Executed, Gloucester 1587.
John Sandys, seminary priest. Born in Lancashire between 1550 and 1555, studied at Oxford and Douai. Arrested in Gloucestershire. Executed 11 August 1586, Gloucester.
Richard Sergeant, seminary priest. Born in Gloucestershire in the late 1550s. Studied at Douai Abbey. Ordained at Laon in 1583. He worked on English mission for three years, arrested and tried. Executed at Tyburn, 20 April 1586.
John Storey, layman. Born Salisbury. Educated Oxford. MP for Hindon, Wiltshire. Exiled for his religion and executed for treason, Tyburn 1 June 1571.
Henry Webley, layman. Born Gloucester, circa 1558. Charged with sheltering a priest, condemned and executed in London 28 August 1588.
Richard Whiting, Abbot and monk of Glastonbury. Last of long line of abbots, probably born Wrington, Somerset. With John Thorne, treasurer of the Abbey, and Roger James, sacrist, executed on the Tor following trial at Wells, 15 November 1539.

Clifton Ordo

http://universalis.com/atomabout.xml#20181114.3 2018-11-13T19:00:00Z 2018-11-13T19:00:00Z The Reading Martyrs
Celebrated: 14 Nov (Berkshire)
Hugh Cook adopted the surname Faringdon when he became a Benedictine monk, at some time before 1500. Although Faringdon is the name of a town in Berkshire (now Oxfordshire) to the north-west of Reading, he later adopted the arms of the Cook family of Kent and so presumably had some connection with them. He is believed to have been educated within Reading Abbey, and later served as sub-chamberlain of the community. He was elected (the last) Abbot of Reading Abbey in 1520, and served as a Justice for the Peace and on various governmental commissions in the country of Berkshire between 1526 and 1538. In 1539 he was indicted for high treason, and imprisoned in the Tower of London for two months. He was taken back to the abbey and hung, drawn and quartered in front of the gatehouse on 14 November 1539 along with John Eynon (Oynon), vicar of St Giles’ in Reading and the abbot’s chief councillor, and John Rugge (Rugg, Rugke, Rogke) a prebendary of Chichester Cathedral who had retired to the abbey in Reading.
All three were beatified by Leo XIII in 1895.

Portsmouth Ordo

http://universalis.com/atomabout.xml#20181114.4 2018-11-13T19:00:00Z 2018-11-13T19:00:00Z All Carmelite Saints
Celebrated: 14 Nov
On this day the Carmelite Order celebrates the memory of all its saints, those known and those unknown.
http://universalis.com/atomabout.xml#20181115.0 2018-11-14T19:00:00Z 2018-11-14T19:00:00Z St Albert the Great (1206 - 1280)
Celebrated: 15 Nov (worldwide)
He was born at Lauingen on the Danube, in Germany, and studied at Padua and Paris before entering the Dominican Order. He taught in a number of places including the University of Paris, where St Thomas Aquinas studied under him.
He was one of the greatest philosophers of the Middle Ages, coming at the beginning of the great flowering that came with the rediscovery of the works of Aristotle. He had a great interest in science and astronomy and his learning gave him the title, as a Doctor of the Church, of Doctor Universalis, the “Universal Doctor.”
In 1260 the Pope made him Bishop of Regensburg, a post that he held for three years before resigning it. He made great efforts to secure peace between people and between cities. He died at Cologne in 1280.
See the articles in Wikipedia and the Catholic Encyclopaedia.
http://universalis.com/atomabout.xml#20181115.1 2018-11-14T19:00:00Z 2018-11-14T19:00:00Z Commemoration of All Carmelite Souls
Celebrated: 15 Nov
On this day the Carmelite Order remembers in prayer all the members of the Carmelite Family who have died.
http://universalis.com/atomabout.xml#20181116.0 2018-11-15T19:00:00Z 2018-11-15T19:00:00Z St Margaret of Scotland (1046 - 1093)
Celebrated: 16 Nov (worldwide)
She was born in Hungary of Anglo-Saxon and Hungarian parents. When William of Normandy conquered England she found refuge with King Malcolm III of Scotland, and they were married in 1070 and had eight children. She reformed the royal court, founded monasteries, and supported major reforms of Church life. She died in Edinburgh on 16 November 1093. She is remembered for the happiness of her marriage, for her devotion to prayer and learning, and especially for her generosity to the poor.
http://universalis.com/atomabout.xml#20181116.1 2018-11-15T19:00:00Z 2018-11-15T19:00:00Z St Gertrude (1256 - 1301/2)
Celebrated: 16 Nov (worldwide)
She was born at Eisleben in Thuringia. As a girl she was educated by the Benedictine nuns at Helfta and was particularly talented at literature and philosophy. She turned to God and became a nun herself. She was devoted to the mystery of the Incarnation, in particular to the Sacred Heart of Jesus and to the Eucharist. She was the recipient of many mystical experiences, and her spiritual writings had great influence in later centuries and indirectly contributed to the establishment of the feast of the Sacred Heart.
See the article in the Catholic Encyclopaedia.
http://universalis.com/atomabout.xml#20181116.2 2018-11-15T19:00:00Z 2018-11-15T19:00:00Z St Edmund of Abingdon (1175? - 1240)
Celebrated: 16 Nov (England)
St Edmund Rich was born at St Edmund’s Lane, Abingdon, on 20 November, probably in the year 1175. His father was a rich merchant, hence the surname (which he never in fact used himself). Under the influence of his mother he led an ascetic life. He studied at Oxford and Paris, and became a teacher in about 1200 or a little earlier. For six years he lectured on mathematics and dialectics, apparently dividing his time between Oxford and Paris, and winning distinction for his part in introducing the study of Aristotle. He is the first known Oxford Master of Arts, and the place where he taught was eventually renamed St Edmund Hall.
Between 1205 and 1210 he changed direction, studying theology and being ordained a priest. He took a doctorate in divinity, and soon won fame as a lecturer on theology and as an extemporaneous preacher. Some time between 1219 and 1222 he was appointed vicar of the parish of Calne in Wiltshire and Treasurer of Salisbury Cathedral, and finally became Archbishop of Canterbury in 1233. He was a notable and effective reforming Bishop. His love for discipline and justice aroused opposition, and he found himself ranged against Rome as champion of the national Church. Eventually, like his predecessors St Thomas Becket and Stephen Langton, he retired to Pontigny, where he is buried. He died at Soisy-Bouy on 16 November 1240.
Devotion to him was especially marked at Abingdon, and at Catesby where his sisters were both nuns. Edmund was canonised in 1246, and is the Joint-Principal Patron of the Diocese of Portsmouth.
He is venerated as a vigorous and reforming bishop and as a peacemaker, as well as being a distinguished commentator on the Scriptures and an effective spiritual writer.
http://universalis.com/atomabout.xml#20181116.3 2018-11-15T19:00:00Z 2018-11-15T19:00:00Z Our Lady of the Gate of Dawn
Celebrated: 16 Nov (Belarus)
Vilnius (Wilno in Polish) is the capital of Lithuania, which was part of the multi-ethnic Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth until this was destroyed in 1793 by the Prussian, Austrian and Russian Empires. Lithuania was taken over by the Russian Empire; then, after a brief period of independence between the wars, it was illegally occupied by the Soviet Union until the Soviet Union’s collapse in 1989.
In the Chapel of the Gate of Dawn there is a painting of the Blessed Virgin Mary which has been venerated by the faithful since the 17th century, and which became a symbol of the national identity that the invaders sought to obliterate. Our Lady of the Gate of Dawn (Lithuanian: Aušros Vartų Dievo Motina, Polish: Matka Boska Ostrobramska, Belarusian: Мац Божая Вастрабрамская) is a major focus of pilgrimage from the successor states of the Commonwealth: Poland, Lithuania, Belarus and Ukraine.
Pope John Paul II visited the chapel in 1993.
See also the article in Wikipedia.