Saints of the Day Saints and biographies from the Catholic calendar. This site is copyright © 2017 Universalis Publishing Limited. Universalis Publishing Ltd http://universalis.com/atomabout.xml http://universalis.com/static/bin/icon80.png 2017-11-17T19:00:00Z http://universalis.com/atomabout.xml#20171115.0 2017-11-14T19:00:00Z 2017-11-14T19:00:00Z St Albert the Great (1206 - 1280)
Celebrated: 15 Nov (worldwide)
He was born at Lauingen on the Danube, in Germany, and studied at Padua and Paris before entering the Dominican Order. He taught in a number of places including the University of Paris, where St Thomas Aquinas studied under him.
He was one of the greatest philosophers of the Middle Ages, coming at the beginning of the great flowering that came with the rediscovery of the works of Aristotle. He had a great interest in science and astronomy and his learning gave him the title, as a Doctor of the Church, of Doctor Universalis, the “Universal Doctor.”
In 1260 the Pope made him Bishop of Regensburg, a post that he held for three years before resigning it. He made great efforts to secure peace between people and between cities. He died at Cologne in 1280.
See the articles in Wikipedia and the Catholic Encyclopaedia.
http://universalis.com/atomabout.xml#20171116.0 2017-11-15T19:00:00Z 2017-11-15T19:00:00Z St Margaret of Scotland (1046 - 1093)
Celebrated: 16 Nov (worldwide)
She was born in Hungary of Anglo-Saxon and Hungarian parents. When William of Normandy conquered England she found refuge with King Malcolm III of Scotland, and they were married in 1070 and had eight children. She reformed the royal court, founded monasteries, and supported major reforms of Church life. She died in Edinburgh on 16 November 1093. She is remembered for the happiness of her marriage, for her devotion to prayer and learning, and especially for her generosity to the poor.
http://universalis.com/atomabout.xml#20171116.1 2017-11-15T19:00:00Z 2017-11-15T19:00:00Z St Gertrude (1256 - 1301/2)
Celebrated: 16 Nov (worldwide)
She was born at Eisleben in Thuringia. As a girl she was educated by the Benedictine nuns at Helfta and was particularly talented at literature and philosophy. She turned to God and became a nun herself. She was devoted to the mystery of the Incarnation, in particular to the Sacred Heart of Jesus and to the Eucharist. She was the recipient of many mystical experiences, and her spiritual writings had great influence in later centuries and indirectly contributed to the establishment of the feast of the Sacred Heart.
See the article in the Catholic Encyclopaedia.
http://universalis.com/atomabout.xml#20171116.2 2017-11-15T19:00:00Z 2017-11-15T19:00:00Z St Edmund of Abingdon (1175? - 1240)
Celebrated: 16 Nov (England)
St Edmund Rich was born at St Edmund’s Lane, Abingdon, on 20 November, probably in the year 1175. His father was a rich merchant, hence the surname (which he never in fact used himself). Under the influence of his mother he led an ascetic life. He studied at Oxford and Paris, and became a teacher in about 1200 or a little earlier. For six years he lectured on mathematics and dialectics, apparently dividing his time between Oxford and Paris, and winning distinction for his part in introducing the study of Aristotle. He is the first known Oxford Master of Arts, and the place where he taught was eventually renamed St Edmund Hall.
Between 1205 and 1210 he changed direction, studying theology and being ordained a priest. He took a doctorate in divinity, and soon won fame as a lecturer on theology and as an extemporaneous preacher. Some time between 1219 and 1222 he was appointed vicar of the parish of Calne in Wiltshire and Treasurer of Salisbury Cathedral, and finally became Archbishop of Canterbury in 1233. He was a notable and effective reforming Bishop. His love for discipline and justice aroused opposition, and he found himself ranged against Rome as champion of the national Church. Eventually, like his predecessors St Thomas Becket and Stephen Langton, he retired to Pontigny, where he is buried. He died at Soisy-Bouy on 16 November 1240.
Devotion to him was especially marked at Abingdon, and at Catesby where his sisters were both nuns. Edmund was canonised in 1246, and is the Joint-Principal Patron of the Diocese of Portsmouth.
He is venerated as a vigorous and reforming bishop and as a peacemaker, as well as being a distinguished commentator on the Scriptures and an effective spiritual writer.
http://universalis.com/atomabout.xml#20171116.3 2017-11-15T19:00:00Z 2017-11-15T19:00:00Z Our Lady of the Gate of Dawn
Celebrated: 16 Nov (Belarus)
Vilnius (Wilno in Polish) is the capital of Lithuania, which was part of the multi-ethnic Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth until this was destroyed in 1793 by the Prussian, Austrian and Russian Empires. Lithuania was taken over by the Russian Empire; then, after a brief period of independence between the wars, it was illegally occupied by the Soviet Union until the Soviet Union’s collapse in 1989.
In the Chapel of the Gate of Dawn there is a painting of the Blessed Virgin Mary which has been venerated by the faithful since the 17th century, and which became a symbol of the national identity that the invaders sought to obliterate. Our Lady of the Gate of Dawn (Lithuanian: Aušros Vartų Dievo Motina, Polish: Matka Boska Ostrobramska, Belarusian: Мац Божая Вастрабрамская) is a major focus of pilgrimage from the successor states of the Commonwealth: Poland, Lithuania, Belarus and Ukraine.
Pope John Paul II visited the chapel in 1993.
See also the article in Wikipedia.
http://universalis.com/atomabout.xml#20171117.0 2017-11-16T19:00:00Z 2017-11-16T19:00:00Z St Elizabeth of Hungary (1207 - 1231)
Celebrated: 17 Nov (worldwide)
19 Nov (Nottingham)

She was a daughter of the King of Hungary. She was given in marriage to Ludwig, the Landgrave of Thuringia, by whom she had three children. She frequently meditated on heavenly things and when her husband died she embraced poverty and built a hospice in which she cared for the sick herself.
See the article in Wikipedia.
http://universalis.com/atomabout.xml#20171117.1 2017-11-16T19:00:00Z 2017-11-16T19:00:00Z St Hilda (614 - 680)
Celebrated: 17 Nov (England)
12 Oct (Nottingham)

Saint Hilda (or Hild) was born in Northumbria in 614. She was the grandniece of King Edwin of Northumbria and was not baptised until the age of 13, when she was received into the Church by Paulinus at York, at the same time as King Edwin and many of his nobles.
The first part of Hilda’s life was spent in the ordinary secular pursuits of the day. But these were years of constant warfare and in 655, her sister Hereswith, the wife of the King of the East Angles, suffered the loss of her husband in battle and decided to withdraw from the world to the monastery of Cale in Paris where she entered religious life. At the age of 33, Hilda decided to follow her and was only prevented from doing so by the intervention of St Aidan who directed her first to establish a small religious house on the north bank of the Wear where she stayed for a year, and then to take charge of the monastery of Hieu at Hartlepool. She proved to be an able and wise superior and, after several years at Hartlepool, she set about establishing the famous double monastery at Whitby which she governed for the rest of her life.
Hilda was an extraordinary woman for her time. Her influence was widespread and her advice was valued by high and low alike. In her monastery she gave ‘a great example of peace and charity’, as Bede says ‘all who knew her called her mother, such were her wonderful godliness and grace.’ She laid emphasis on the study of the Scriptures and insisted on careful preparation for the priesthood, after the manner of St Aidan on Lindisfarne. Among her community was the first English poet, Caedmon, who had been the community’s herdsman until his poetic genius was discovered. After the death of St Aidan, when the divisions between those who held the Celtic tradition and those who supported Roman ways became critical, it was at her monastery that the important Synod of Whitby was held in 644 to decide upon a common Church order among the rival parties.
Although her last seven years were a time of constant illness, she continued to lead her community to the end. Towards daybreak on 17 November 680 she asked for, and received, viaticum and died peacefully with her community around her or as St Bede says, ‘she joyfully saw death approaching… and passed from death to life.’

Middlesbrough Ordo

http://universalis.com/atomabout.xml#20171117.2 2017-11-16T19:00:00Z 2017-11-16T19:00:00Z St Hugh of Lincoln (1140 - 1200)
Celebrated: 17 Nov (England)
He was born near Grenoble in France and entered the Carthusian monastery of La Grande Chartreuse at the age of 25. In 1175 he was asked by King Henry II of England to become prior of a Carthusian house in England, and a decade later he was appointed bishop of Lincoln, a post which he accepted only when directly commanded to do so by the prior of La Grande Chartreuse. His diocese was the largest in England, and he spent the rest of his life in ceaseless work there. He delegated much authority. He was a friend (and critic) of successive kings, but also worked with his own hands on the extension of his cathedral. He gained a great reputation for justice, the care of the sick, and the support of the oppressed: he risked his life to help the Jewish community. He died in London on 16 November 1200 and was declared a saint in 1220, the first Carthusian to be canonized.
http://universalis.com/atomabout.xml#20171117.3 2017-11-16T19:00:00Z 2017-11-16T19:00:00Z St Dionysius of Alexandria, Bishop (190 - 265)
Celebrated: 17 Nov (Southern Africa)
Dionysius was born in Alexandria in 190. After studying literature and philosophy, he became a Christian and joined the catechetical school where he was taught by Origen. In 232 he became the head of that school. Fifteen years later he was appointed bishop of Alexandria and had to endure severe persecutions and even exile because of his boldness in proclaiming the faith. He involved himself in major theological disputes of the time. He died in 265.
http://universalis.com/atomabout.xml#20171118.0 2017-11-17T19:00:00Z 2017-11-17T19:00:00Z The Dedication of the Basilicas of Saints Peter and Paul
Celebrated: 18 Nov (worldwide)
16 Nov (Poland)

Already in the twelfth century there was being celebrated today the anniversary of the dedication of the basilicas of St Peter at the Vatican and St Paul in the Via Ostiense by Pope St Silvester and Pope St Siricius in the fourth century. More recently this commemoration has been extended to the whole Church, honouring the two greatest apostles of Christ just as the anniversary of the dedication of St Mary Major (5 August) celebrates the motherhood of the Virgin Mother of God.
http://universalis.com/atomabout.xml#20171118.1 2017-11-17T19:00:00Z 2017-11-17T19:00:00Z Saturday memorials of the Blessed Virgin Mary
Celebrated: 18 Nov
‘On Saturdays in Ordinary Time when there is no obligatory memorial, an optional memorial of the Blessed Virgin Mary is allowed.
‘Saturdays stand out among those days dedicated to the Virgin Mary. These are designated as memorials of the Blessed Virgin Mary. This memorial derives from Carolingian times (9th century), but the reasons for having chosen Saturday for its observance are unknown. While many explanations of this choice have been advanced, none is completely satisfactory from the point of view of the history of popular piety.
‘Whatever its historical origins may be, today the memorial rightly emphasizes certain values to which contemporary spirituality is more sensitive. It is a remembrance of the maternal example and discipleship of the Blessed Virgin Mary who, strengthened by faith and hope, on that “great Saturday” on which Our Lord lay in the tomb, was the only one of the disciples to hold vigil in expectation of the Lord’s resurrection. It is a prelude and introduction to the celebration of Sunday, the weekly memorial of the Resurrection of Christ. It is a sign that the Virgin Mary is continuously present and operative in the life of the Church.’

Directory on Popular Piety and the Liturgy (2001), §188

http://universalis.com/atomabout.xml#20171118.2 2017-11-17T19:00:00Z 2017-11-17T19:00:00Z Saint Rose Philippine Duchesne (1769 - 1852)
Celebrated: 18 Nov (United States)
She was born to a noble family at Grenoble in France. She joined the Visitation nuns at the age of 18 but the community was abolished by the French Revolution. After several attempts to re-establish it, Philippine with some of her companions joined the recently-founded Religious of the Sacred Heart. She had always dreamt of being a missionary and in 1818 she sailed for the New World. She landed at New Orleans and she and her companions settled at St Charles, Missouri. They founded an orphanage: other foundations followed, and she is credited with saving the Jesuit mission to Missouri from failure, helping them in any way she could and sharing her community’s few resources with them.
Philippine longed to spread the gospel among the Indian tribes. At the age of 72 she went with three companions to start a school for Indian girls at Sugar Creek, Kansas. She only stayed there a year, but although she was unable to learn the language her habit of constant prayer was a lasting inspiration to the pupils. She spent the last 10 years of her life back at St Charles, in constant prayer before the Blessed Sacrament.
See also the article in Wikipedia.