Universalis
Wednesday 30 May 2018    (other days)
Wednesday of week 8 in Ordinary Time 

Cry out with joy to God, all the earth: serve the Lord with gladness.

Year: B(II). Psalm week: 4. Liturgical Colour: Green.

Other saints: St Luke Kirby (c.1549-1582)
30 May (where celebrated)
Luke Kirby was born in the north of England about 1549, was brought up in the new faith and is said to have graduated M.A., probably at Cambridge. Having been reconciled to the Church at Louvain, he entered Douai College in 1576, and was ordained priest at Cambrai in September the following year. He left Reims for England on 3 May, 1578, but very soon returned to the English College in Rome, where he took the college oath to serve on the English mission. In June 1580, he came to England, landing at Dover. He was immediately arrested and committed to the Gatehouse, Westminster. From there he was transferred to the Tower, where he was subjected to the “Scavenger’s Daughter” for more than an hour. (This was a device named after William Skeffington, Lieutenant of the Tower of London; it was an A-frame shaped metal rack, the head being strapped to the top point of the A, the hands at the mid-point and the legs at the lower spread ends; swinging the head down and forcing the knees up in a sitting position so compressed the body as to force the blood from the nose and ears). He was condemned, 17 November, 1581, and from 2 April till the day of his death on 30 May 1582 he was kept in irons.
DK
Other saints: The Yorkshire Martyrs
Leeds
Margaret Clitherow (née Middleton, born 1556) married John Clitherow, a butcher, when she was 15. She became a Catholic three years later and did all she could to hide Catholic priests, it being a capital offence to work as a priest. Mass was said regularly in her house and next door. In 1586 she was arrested for harbouring priests. She refused to testify to prevent her children being forced to give evidence. She was executed by being crushed to death. Her body was secretly taken away by friends and has never been found. A plaque marks the site of her execution.
  Henry Walpole (1558-1595) was a lawyer who converted to Catholicism when he was 22. After being ordained a priest abroad he came to England and was arrested within days of his arrival. He was tortured brutally in London over a period of nearly two years. He was eventually taken to York (having originally landed in the north) where he was executed.
  Margaret Clitherow and Henry Walpole lead a company of twenty Blessed Martyrs and thirty Venerable Martyrs, put to death within the County of York in penal times. Their names may be joined by those other confessors to the Faith who died in the prisons of York and Hull, and to those other martyrs, such as John Fisher and Luke Kirby, natives of the county, who suffered elsewhere.
DK

Liturgical colour: green
The theological virtue of hope is symbolized by the colour green, just as the burning fire of love is symbolized by red. Green is the colour of growing things, and hope, like them, is always new and always fresh. Liturgically, green is the colour of Ordinary Time, the season in which we are being neither especially penitent (in purple) nor overwhelmingly joyful (in white).

Mid-morning reading (Terce)1 Corinthians 10:24,31 ©
Nobody should be looking for his own advantage, but everybody for the other man’s. Whatever you eat, whatever you drink, whatever you do at all, do it for the glory of God.

Noon reading (Sext)Colossians 3:17 ©
Never say or do anything except in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God the Father through him.

Afternoon reading (None)Colossians 3:23-24 ©
Whatever your work is, put your heart into it as if it were for the Lord and not for men, knowing that the Lord will repay you by making you his heirs. It is Christ the Lord that you are serving.

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Office of Readings for Wednesday of week 8

Morning Prayer for Wednesday of week 8

Evening Prayer for Wednesday of week 8

Full page including sources and copyrights

Scripture readings taken from the Jerusalem Bible, published and copyright © 1966, 1967 and 1968 by Darton, Longman & Todd, Ltd and Doubleday, a division of Random House, Inc, and used by permission of the publishers. For on-line information about other Random House, Inc. books and authors, see the Internet web site at http://www.randomhouse.com.
 
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