Universalis
Tuesday 21 August 2018    (other days)
Saint Pius X, Pope 
 (Tuesday of week 20 in Ordinary Time)

Office of Readings

If this is the first Hour that you are reciting today, you should precede it with the Invitatory Psalm.


INTRODUCTION
O God, come to our aid.
  O Lord, make haste to help us.
Glory be to the Father and to the Son
  and to the Holy Spirit,
as it was in the beginning,
  is now, and ever shall be,
  world without end.
Amen. Alleluia.

Hymn
O God of truth and Lord of power,
whose word their course to things assigns,
whose splendour lights the morning hour,
whose fiery sun at noonday shines:
Within us quench the flames of strife,
the harmful heat of passion quell;
give health of body to our life
and give true peace of soul as well.
In this, most loving Father, hear,
and Christ, co-equal Son, our prayer:
with Holy Ghost, one Trinity,
you reign for all eternity.

Psalm 101 (102)
Prayers and vows of an exile
Let my cry come to you, Lord: do not hide your face from me.
Lord, listen to my prayer
  and let my cry come to you.
Do not hide your face from me:
  whenever I am troubled,
  turn to me and hear me.
Whenever I call on you,
  hurry to answer me.
For my days vanish like smoke,
  and my bones are dry as tinder.
My heart is cut down like grass, it is dry –
  I cannot remember to eat.
The sound of my groaning
  makes my bones stick to my flesh.
I am lonely as a pelican in the wilderness,
  as an owl in the ruins,
  as a sparrow alone on a rooftop:
  I do not sleep.
All day long my enemies taunt me,
  they burn with anger and use my name as a curse.
I make ashes my bread,
  I mix tears with my drink,
  because of your anger and reproach –
you, who raised me up, have dashed me to the ground.
My days fade away like a shadow:
  I wither like grass.
Glory be to the Father and to the Son
  and to the Holy Spirit,
as it was in the beginning,
  is now, and ever shall be,
  world without end.
Amen.
Let my cry come to you, Lord: do not hide your face from me.

Psalm 101 (102)
Turn, Lord, to the prayers of the helpless.
But you, Lord, remain for ever
  and your name lasts from generation to generation.
You will rise up and take pity on Zion,
  for it is time that you pitied it,
  indeed it is time:
for your servants love its very stones
  and pity even its dust.
Then, Lord, the peoples will fear your name.
  All the kings of the earth will fear your glory,
when the Lord has rebuilt Zion
  and appeared there in his glory;
when he has listened to the prayer of the destitute
  and not rejected their pleading.
These things shall be written for the next generation
  and a people yet to be born shall praise the Lord:
because he has looked down from his high sanctuary,
 – the Lord has looked down from heaven to earth –
and heard the groans of prisoners
  and freed the children of death
so that they could proclaim the Lord’s name in Zion
  and sing his praises in Jerusalem,
where people and kingdoms gather together
  to serve the Lord.
Glory be to the Father and to the Son
  and to the Holy Spirit,
as it was in the beginning,
  is now, and ever shall be,
  world without end.
Amen.
Turn, Lord, to the prayers of the helpless.

Psalm 101 (102)
You founded the earth, Lord, and the heavens are the work of your hands.
He has brought down my strength in the midst of my journey;
  he has shortened my days.
I will say, “My God, do not take me away
  half way through the days of my life.
Your years last from generation to generation:
  in the beginning you founded the earth,
  and the heavens are the work of your hands.
They will pass away but you will remain;
  all will grow old, like clothing,
  and like a cloak you will change them, and they will be changed.
“But you are always the same,
  your years will never run out.
The children of your servants shall live in peace,
  their descendants will endure in your sight.”
Glory be to the Father and to the Son
  and to the Holy Spirit,
as it was in the beginning,
  is now, and ever shall be,
  world without end.
Amen.
You founded the earth, Lord, and the heavens are the work of your hands.

℣. Give heed, my people, to my teaching.
℟. Turn your ears to the words of my mouth.

First ReadingIsaiah 7:1-17 ©
In fear of war, the sign of Emmanuel
In the reign of Ahaz son of Jotham, son of Uzziah, king of Judah, Razon the king of Aram went up against Jerusalem with Pekah son of Remaliah, king of Israel, to lay siege to it; but he was unable to capture it.
  The news was brought to the House of David. ‘Aram’ they said ‘has reached Ephraim.’ Then the heart of the king and the hearts of the people shuddered as the trees of the forest shudder in front of the wind. The Lord said to Isaiah, ‘Go with your son Shear-jashub, and meet Ahaz at the end of the conduit of the upper pool on the Fuller’s Field road, and say to him:
“Pay attention, keep calm, have no fear,
do not let your heart sink
because of these two smouldering stumps of firebrands,
or because Aram, Ephraim and the son of Remaliah
have plotted to ruin you, and have said:
Let us invade Judah and terrorise it
and seize it for ourselves,
and set up a king there,
the son of Tabeel.
The Lord says this:
It shall not come true; it shall not be.
The capital of Aram is Damascus,
the head of Damascus, Razon;
the capital of Ephraim, Samaria,
the head of Samaria, the son of Remaliah.
Six or five years more
and a shattered Ephraim shall no longer be a people.
But if you do not stand by me,
you will not stand at all.”’
Once again the Lord spoke to Ahaz and said, ‘Ask the Lord your God for a sign for yourself coming either from the depths of Sheol or from the heights above.’ ‘No,’ Ahaz answered ‘I will not put the Lord to the test.’
  Then he said:
Listen now, House of David:
are you not satisfied with trying the patience of men
without trying the patience of my God, too?
The Lord himself, therefore,
will give you a sign.
It is this: the maiden is with child
and will soon give birth to a son
whom she will call Immanuel.
On curds and honey will he feed
until he knows how to refuse evil
and choose good.
For before this child knows how to refuse evil
and choose good,
the land whose two kings terrify you
will be deserted.
The Lord will bring times for you
and your people and your father’s House,
such as have not come
since Ephraim broke away from Judah
(the king of Assyria).
Responsory
Is 7:14, 8:10; Lk 1:30-31
℟. Behold, a young woman shall conceive and bear a son,* and he shall be called Immanuel, for God is with us.
℣. Do not be afraid, Mary. You will conceive in your womb and bear a son,* and he shall be called Immanuel, for God is with us.

Second Reading
From the apostolic constitution Divino afflatu of Pope Saint Pius X
The song of the Church
The collection of psalms found in Scripture, composed as it was under divine inspiration, has, from the very beginnings of the Church, shown a wonderful power of fostering devotion among Christians as they offer to God a continuous sacrifice of praise, the harvest of lips blessing his name. Following a custom already established in the Old Law, the psalms have played a conspicuous part in the sacred liturgy itself, and in the divine office. Thus was born what Basil calls the voice of the Church, that singing of psalms, which is the daughter of that hymn of praise (to use the words of our predecessor, Urban VIII) which goes up unceasingly before the throne of God and of the Lamb, and which teaches those especially charged with the duty of divine worship, as Athanasius says, the way to praise God, and the fitting words in which to bless him. Augustine expresses this well when he says: God praised himself so that man might give him fitting praise; because God chose to praise himself man found the way in which to bless God.
  The psalms have also a wonderful power to awaken in our hearts the desire for every virtue. Athanasius says: Though all Scripture, both old and new, is divinely inspired and has its use in teaching, as we read in Scripture itself, yet the Book of Psalms, like a garden enclosing the fruits of all the other books, produces its fruits in song, and in the process of singing brings forth its own special fruits to take their place beside them. In the same place Athanasius rightly adds: The psalms seem to me to be like a mirror, in which the person using them can see himself, and the stirrings of his own heart; he can recite them against the background of his own emotions. Augustine says in his Confessions: How I wept when I heard your hymns and canticles, being deeply moved by the sweet singing of your Church. Those voices flowed into my ears, truth filtered into my heart, and from my heart surged waves of devotion. Tears ran down, and I was happy in my tears.
  Indeed, who could fail to be moved by those many passages in the psalms which set forth so profoundly the infinite majesty of God, his omnipotence, his justice and goodness and clemency, too deep for words, and all the other infinite qualities of his that deserve our praise? Who could fail to be roused to the same emotions by the prayers of thanksgiving to God for blessings received, by the petitions, so humble and confident, for blessings still awaited, by the cries of a soul in sorrow for sin committed? Who would not be fired with love as he looks on the likeness of Christ, the redeemer, here so lovingly foretold? His was the voice Augustine heard in every psalm, the voice of praise, of suffering, of joyful expectation, of present distress.
Responsory
℟. God has approved us as fit to be entrusted with the gospel, and on those terms we speak.* We do not curry favour with men; we seek only the favour of God.
℣. The appeal we make never springs from error or base motive: there is no attempt to deceive.* We do not curry favour with men; we seek only the favour of God.

Let us pray.
Lord God, you filled Pope Saint Pius with wisdom
  and gave him the strength of an apostle
  to defend the Catholic faith and to renew all things in Christ.
Grant that we may follow his example and teaching,
  and so come to our reward in heaven.
Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
  who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
  one God, for ever and ever.
Amen.

Let us praise the Lord.
– Thanks be to God.

The psalms and canticles here are our own translation. The Grail translation of the psalms, which is used liturgically in most of the English-speaking world, cannot be displayed on the Web for copyright reasons. The Universalis apps, programs and downloads do contain the Grail translation of the psalms.

You can also view this page in Latin and English.

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