Universalis
Monday 9 August 2021    (other days)
Monday of week 19 in Ordinary Time 
 or Saint Teresa Benedicta of the Cross (Edith Stein), Virgin, Martyr 

Let us come before the Lord, giving thanks.

Year: B(I). Psalm week: 3. Liturgical Colour: Green.

St Teresa Benedicta of the Cross (1891 - 1942)

She was born into a practising Jewish family. She had a distinguished career as a philosopher and received a doctorate at the University of Freiburg, but her academic career was impeded because she was a woman.
  Reading the autobiography of Saint Teresa of Ávila brought about her conversion to Catholicism and she was baptized on 1 January 1922. She taught at a Dominican girls’ school and studied Catholic philosophy. She became a lecturer at the Institute for Pedagogy at Münster but was thrown out of her post in 1933 as a result of the Nazi régime’s anti-Semitic legislation.
  She entered a Carmelite monastery in Cologne and took the name Teresa Benedicta of the Cross. Her order moved her to the Netherlands to keep her safe from the growing Nazi threat. While a Carmelite she wrote an important philosophical book, seeking to combine the phenomenology of her former teacher Edmund Husserl with the philosophy of Aquinas, and she also wrote on St John of the Cross.
  On 20 July 1942 the Dutch Bishops’ Conference had a statement read in all churches condemning Nazi racism. In retaliation the authorities ordered the arrest of all Jewish converts to Christianity. Teresa Benedicta was taken to Auschwitz and killed on 9 August 1942.

Other saints: Saint Nathy

Ireland
He is the patron saint of the diocese of Achonry, where he founded a church and monastery. See this article for a little more information.

Other saints: Saint Felim

Ireland
He flourished in the early part of the sixth century and is the first known Bishop of Kilmore. He is patron saint of the diocese.

About the author of the Second Reading in today's Office of Readings:

Second Reading: Theodoret of Cyrus (c.393 - 457)

Theodoret of Cyrus or Cyrrhus was an influential theologian of the School of Antioch, biblical commentator, and Christian bishop of Cyrrhus. He played a pivotal role in the Christological controversies in the 5th-century Byzantine church, notably the Nestorian controversy concerning the twofold nature of Christ and the validity of the title “Mother of God”. Having experienced in his own diocese the process of reconciling heretics and schismatics to the Church, he strove earnestly for unity by urging the condemnation of Nestorius’ heretical doctrines without personally condemning Nestorius himself. As a result he himself found himself condemned and excommunicated by the Second Council of Ephesus, and was rehabilitated only after the death of the Emperor and an appeal to Pope Leo the Great. He was declared orthodox by the Council of Chalcedon.
  Theodoret wrote many commentaries on Scripture and some doctrinal works, including On the Incarnation of the Lord, which provides some Second Readings for the Office of Readings.

Liturgical colour: green

The theological virtue of hope is symbolized by the colour green, just as the burning fire of love is symbolized by red. Green is the colour of growing things, and hope, like them, is always new and always fresh. Liturgically, green is the colour of Ordinary Time, the orderly sequence of weeks through the year, a season in which we are being neither single-mindedly penitent (in purple) nor overwhelmingly joyful (in white).

Mid-morning reading (Terce)2 Corinthians 13:11 ©
Brethren, be joyful. Try to grow perfect; help one another. Be united; live in peace, and the God of love and peace will be with you.

Noon reading (Sext)Romans 6:22 ©
Now you have been set free from sin, you have been made slaves of God, and you get a reward leading to your sanctification and ending in eternal life.

Afternoon reading (None)Colossians 1:21-22 ©
Not long ago, you were foreigners and enemies, in the way that you used to think and the evil things that you did; but now he has reconciled you, by his death and in that mortal body. Now you are able to appear before him holy, pure and blameless.
Scripture readings taken from The Jerusalem Bible, published and copyright © 1966, 1967 and 1968 by Darton, Longman & Todd, Ltd and Doubleday, a division of Random House, Inc, and used by permission of the publishers. For on-line information about other Random House, Inc. books and authors, see the Internet web site at http://www.randomhouse.com.
 
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