Universalis
Tuesday 3 March 2020    (other days)
Tuesday of the 1st week of Lent 

Christ the Lord was tempted and suffered for us. Come, let us adore him.
Or: O that today you would listen to his voice: harden not your hearts.

Year: A(II). Psalm week: 1. Liturgical Colour: Violet.

Other saints: St Katharine Drexel (1858 - 1955)
United States
She was born in Philadelphia to a rich banking family. In 1891, at the age of 33, she founded the Sisters of the Blessed Sacrament, an order dedicated to mission work among Indians and black people. (A survey of the situation in the United States at this time described “250,000 Indians neglected, if not practically abandoned, and over nine million of negroes still struggling through the aftermath of slavery”). She spent her entire life and her entire fortune to this work, opening schools, founding a university, and funding many chapels, convents and monasteries. She died on 3 March 1955, by which time there were more than 500 Sisters teaching in 63 schools throughout the United States. See the article in Wikipedia. The Catholic Encyclopaedia has articles on her father and the Sisters of the Blessed Sacrament.
Other saints: St Vignal (c.460 - 532)
Alderney
Vignal is a patois corruption of the Latin Guingualeus, itself a translation of the French Guénolé or Guignole, from the Anglo-Saxon Winwaloe / Winwallus / Winwalloc. There are some fifty variants of his name, which survives in the dedication of some churches in Brittany, Cornwall and Monmouthshire.
  St Vignal was born about the year 460, possibly in Plouguin, to Fracan, a prince of Dumnonia [Brittany] and his wife Gwen Teirbron [“Gwen the Triple-Breasted”]. He became the first Abbot founder of the Abbey of Landévennec, just south of Brest, and died there on 3 March 532.
  He is supposed to have assisted St Sampson and St Magloire in evangelising the Bailiwick of Guernsey, which includes Alderney, in the 6th century. Some relics were preserved at Montreuil-sur-Mer and in St Peter’s, Ghent, and until the 19th century his tomb was visible in the church at Landévennec.
Portsmouth Ordo

About the author of the Second Reading in today's Office of Readings:

Second Reading: St Cyprian (210 - 258)
Cyprian was born in Carthage and spent most of his life in the practice of the law. He was converted to Christianity, and was made bishop of Carthage in 249. He steered the church through troubled times, including the persecution of the emperor Decius, when he went into hiding so as to be able to continue looking after the church. In 258 the persecution of the emperor Valerian began. Cyprian was first exiled and then, on the 14th of September, executed, after a trial notable for the calm and courtesy shown by both sides.
  Cyprian’s many letters and treatises shed much light on a formative period in the Church’s history, and are valuable both for their doctrine and for the picture they paint of a group of people in constant peril of their lives but still determined to keep the faith.

40 Days and 40 Ways: Tuesday, 1st week of Lent
Yes, as the rain and the snow come down from the heavens and do not return without watering the earth, making it yield and giving growth to provide seed for the sower and bread for the eating, so the word that goes from my mouth does not return to me empty, without carrying out my will and succeeding in what it was sent to do. (Is 55:10-11)
  Is 55:10-11
  The first readings during Lent often have their own meanings, and on other occasions are often obviously intended to pair with the Gospel reading. Which of these two is the case today? Does the word sent down from heaven to accomplish God’s purpose have a capital or not?
  In the original position in the Book of Isaiah “word” needs no capital letter, for the passage concludes a section on the effectiveness of the Lord’s will, expressed in prophecy or some other way. The message is that the Lord’s will accomplishes itself inevitably, as inevitably as the rain and snow bring fruitfulness to the soil. But in the context given by the famous use of this passage in the Entry Antiphon for Christmas Midnight Mass, about God’s Word leaping down from heaven to the earth at midnight, it certainly has a capital, referring to God’s eternal Word, the Logos or Christ. Perhaps, then, this little reading should be seen as emphasising the fulfilment of the petitions of the Lord’s Prayer in the Gospel reading, and particularly the central petition, “May your Kingdom come”, which sums up both its neighbouring petitions. It is stressing that the Lord’s Kingdom will come, his name will be held holy and his Will shall be accomplished.
  The Gospel reading for the day is Mt 6:7-15.
  Action:
  Do something special for someone who works with you or for you to show your appreciation of that person.
Dom Henry Wansbrough

This passage is an extract from the booklet “40 Days and 40 Ways” by Dom Henry Wansbrough OSB, published by the Catholic Truth Society and used by permission. “40 Days and 40 Ways” has meditations for each day in Lent. To find out more about the booklet, or to buy it, please visit the CTS web site.

The Universalis Readings at Mass page shows the readings for today’s Mass.


Liturgical colour: violet
Violet is a dark colour, ‘the gloomy cast of the mortified, denoting affliction and melancholy’. Liturgically, it is the colour of Advent and Lent, the seasons of penance and preparation.

Mid-morning reading (Terce)Joel 2:17 ©
Between vestibule and altar let the priests, the ministers of the Lord, lament. Let them say, ‘Spare your people, O Lord! Do not make your heritage a thing of shame, a byword for the nations.’

Noon reading (Sext)Jeremiah 3:25 ©
We have sinned against the Lord our God, we and our ancestors from our youth until today, and we have not listened to the voice of the Lord our God.

Afternoon reading (None)Isaiah 58:1-2 ©
Shout for all you are worth, raise your voice like a trumpet. Proclaim their faults to my people, their sins to the House of Jacob. They seek me day after day, they long to know my ways, like a nation that wants to act with integrity and not ignore the law of its God.
Scripture readings taken from The Jerusalem Bible, published and copyright © 1966, 1967 and 1968 by Darton, Longman & Todd, Ltd and Doubleday, a division of Random House, Inc, and used by permission of the publishers. For on-line information about other Random House, Inc. books and authors, see the Internet web site at http://www.randomhouse.com.
 
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